Hi Graeme, first of all, thank you very much for agreeing to do this interview. Could you tell us a little about yourself and how you got into photography?

I suppose I’ve always been interested in the visual world. As a child, I used to paint these rather odd abstract linear compositions of horizontals and verticals. Some ‘balanced’ better than others to my eye and I’ve remained interested in this idea of ‘training your eye’ through practice most of my life.

My first camera was a 12th birthday present of a Kodak ‘Instamatic’ in 1976. By 16 I’d graduated to a nice Ricoh 500G. I really liked that little camera and it taught me the basics. Both these cameras instilled a love for the ‘rangefinder’ format. I’ve tried with SLR’s but simply don’t get on with the myopia...I like to see inside and outside the frame when taking pictures.
After leaving school I applied to photography school and was, rightly, rejected. I went on to study architecture and that’s my profession.
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
Would you say that your occupation as an architect influences your style of photography and the images that you create?
Yes, but perhaps not in a good way! I think my pictures are quite (too?) controlled compositionally and that this is too much of an objective - their aesthetic intent could be read as superficial or even sentimental, particularly because of the preoccupation with black and white. This is what classifies me as an amateur I think. Much of today’s groundbreaking photography has social commentary at its heart. I don’t have anything bigger to say than ‘here’s a nice photo’, but I’m happy with that.
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
Is there a particular building or place that you enjoy to photograph?
The new Victoria & Albert Museum in Dundee is a building of real quality. Conceived by the architect Kengo Kuma as a large landscape form it fits my photographic preoccupations well - perhaps it has even informed them.
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
Your photography is mostly all black and white, could you share with our readers a top tip that you find useful when photographing in black and white?
I use my camera permanently set to view black and white to concentrate on the qualities of light, form and composition.  Taking a black and white photograph from the instant you see it and press the shutter is different from taking a colour photograph and changing it into black and white in the hope of making it a ‘better picture’.
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
You can only have one lens for the rest of your life, what is it?
I’m flexible on focal length between 28 35 & 50mm but it has to be fast, this is more important. I only use a Leica Q now with a 28mm f1.7 Summilux, which I like very much.
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
If you had to pick a favourite image of yours, what would it be and is there a story behind it?
 
The photograph of the V&A Dundee with the ‘arch’ reflected below is quite strong I think. It’s further animated by the people beneath being serendipitously in the right place at the right time.  A very misty day, which stripped the background noise normally visible through the arch, helped too.
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
What is your favourite photography book?
 

Winogrand: Figments from the Real World’ (Szarkowski, The Museum of Modern Art, New  York 1988).

Winogrand’s work has a directness and objectivity without sentiment. Social commentary and beauty can coexist he demonstrates in this wonderful publication.
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
An Interview with Photographer: Graeme Hutton
Thank you again for taking the time to speak with us Graeme. Before you go, where can our readers find more of your photography?